Philosophy is ambiguous and logical at the same time.


The stereotyped meaning of philosophy is deciphering the truth. But the reality is a far-cry from its traditional meaning as human behaviour is driven by emotions and psycho-pathological traits and various other cognitive factors.

Logical forms and patterns are incapable of encompassing the intricacy of people and situations. Forms and distinctions cannot even define what forms and distinctions are. They are not clear about what clarity is; they cannot define definition. No concept conceptualizes well how concepts work, or patterns, rules, or forms. But it is a great error to denigrate precise patterns or to say that they don't work.

Philosophy is ambiguous and logical at the same time. The effective reason behind this ambiguity is its varied process of articulation.



Content Credits:- Rusha Bhattacharya



India is the ‘pharmacy' of developing countries and her global contribution in the field of medicine is commendable.


The National IPR Policy framed by our Finance Minister, Arun Jaitley with the slogan ‘Creative India, Innovative India' has benefited our IP regimes to a great extent. In compliance with the TRIPS agreement of World Trade Organisation, it lays out the future road map of India.




This policy aims to push IPRs as a marketable financial asset, promotes innovation and entrepreneurship along with the protection of public interest. These legal rights confer an exclusive right to the creator to fully utilize his invention and protect it for a certain period of time. Due to the high stakes of the tech developers, the need to protect the knowledge and creations from unlawful use and ensuring the preservation of money, time and efforts of the investors is both necessary for the creator and public welfare.

However, questions arise with regard to blocking  of life-saving drugs to patients for National IP protection policy. But the reality defies the aforementioned statement completely as IPR policy has imparted to public health along with the protection of innovative inventions efficiently.  Because of the IP protection regimes, patented products are now extended to patients by companies and Government schemes free of cost or a fraction of the original price. Ayushman Bharat is one such recent programme implemented by the Government for the benefit of public health, especially families
below poverty lines. 

On 17th May 2018, Thursday, Union Finance Minister Arun Jaitley presented the Union Budget 2018-19 which comprised the provision of accessibility and affordability of cheaper medicines, through reduction of the stent prices and ensuring free dialysis towards as a step towards improvement in the healthcare sector. Terming Ayushman Bharat to be the greatest National Healthcare scheme of India, Jaitley announces that 10crore poor and vulnerable families will be provided Rs. 5 lakh per year for secondary and tertiary hospitalization. .To ensure that nobody is left out, especially women, children and the elderly people, there will be no cap on family size and age in the scheme. The benefit cover will also include pre and post-hospitalisation expenses.

Hence, the emergence of various Government Schemes are rightly evident of the fact that the National IPR policy has benefited innovation and public concerns in a distinctive way. It is globally acceptable that India is the ‘pharmacy' of developing countries  i.e. it dispenses cheaper and quality vaccinations to the world, her global contribution in the field of medicine is commendable. Also, in the ongoing environment of medical innovation, India evinces its proven record of meeting the critical health-care needs of needy patients leveraging its improvised technology.

Content Credits:- Rusha Bhattacharya









“There is no such thing as work-life balance. Everything worth fighting for unbalances your life.”


Marlow's hierarchy says your needs should be fulfilled in a sequence. At times, in the ordeal of achieving high rated success and fame, we tend to destroy both our personal and social life. Randi Zuckerberg – the sibling of Facebook’s founder – says that one can pick only three things out of work, sleep, family, friends and fitness. It is important to know what really matters to you and to prioritise it. So define the parameters of success in each area you choose and consciously distribute time among multiple goals.

Some major causes of imbalances are

1. Societal expectations
Society sets unrealistic targets for us, which causes unnecessary stress. As a result, you might experience distress on getting average marks in an exam, not earning enough or failing to fulfi l family obligations. To avoid this, learn to distinguish between social conditioning and your priorities.

2. Extreme ambition
Single-minded ambition regarding work comes from internal triggers or from a need for social recognition and success. However, it inevitably leads to hiding failures, avoiding people and ultimately becoming cynical and unhappy. Substitute it with moderated ambition aimed at achieving multiple parallel work and life goals.


3. Desperate for perfection
Social media platforms like Instagram and Facebook show us a false image of the glamorous lives that other people lead. Their lives seem full of impeccable fashion, family, friends, food and fun. If you are seeking total perfection in any area of life, know that it takes time away from other things, leading to greater imbalance and unhappiness.




4. Denied depression
Depression and burnout are socially unacceptable weaknesses. As a result of this taboo, these issues are ignored and rarely shared with others. This leads to rapid deterioration without any attempt to address the causes. Recognise them as mental ailments in both yourself and loved ones, and seek therapy or make lifestyle changes as needed.

5. One size fits all
In a crowded and competitive world, uniform rules are applied to everyone for the sake of 'fairness'. In schools everyone studies all subjects at the same pace. Fixed policies at work leave little room for you to control your life. Try to choose a career and employers that fit your life, not someone else’s.

Content Credits:- Rusha Bhattacharya




HR goes way beyond hiring and firing!


Human Resources Outsourcing is now an ever-growing and ever-improvising strategic revolution in the world of management and technology. HRO refers to the process where an external supplier manages HR activities, such as payroll administration or recruitment, or perhaps the whole human resources function. If you are in any way associated with it, you will notice how these mighty organisations have leveraged the judicious mix of technology with commerce.

HR is nothing but the sheer product of three elements  - time, money and quality. With the growing number of both small and large scale business companies, the magnitude of outsourcing different degrees of corporate tasks had increased to a great extent. HRO is no doubt a way out to attain expert candidates without hiring additional personnel or investing in HR systems at high costs but when it comes to larger companies,  compliance with expertise can prove to be very risky which is thoroughly absorbed by outsourcing services, thereby reducing multi-faced burdens.


According to the Global Reports of The Society of Human Resource Management, 26% of companies outsource to save money. When an external provider’s fees are lower that what it costs for the company to do an HR function internally and 23% of companies outsource to pay attention  on strategy as it shifts their attention from the time-consuming activity of selecting candidates and enables them to focus more on core-business activities.

With today’s emphasis on company culture and loyalty, the role of human resources management  has become increasingly important for a business’s future which is seen to have articulated the constant requirement of Human Resource Outsourcing Services in imparting to a company's brand name.

Content Credits:- Rusha Bhattacharya




In entrepreneurship, Sometimes you win, sometimes you learn.

Entrepreneurship is an adventure; there’s the excitement of breaking new grounds but there’s also the uncertainty of what you’ll find around the bend. Think an explorer with necessary resources a dhow, a compass, a map, food supplies and if lucky a companion. 


Sometime like Christopher Columbus you’ll sail out in search for West Indies but find yourself in America. Like Dr. David living stone you’ll set out to discover the source of River Zambezi but end up at Victoria Falls with a handful of converts. Like Stanley Morton you’ll go in search of a story to find David Livingstone carrying a few guns to scare off wild animals but end up in a bloody war with native tribes. 


In entrepreneurship, Sometimes you win, sometimes you learn.


Content Credits:- Rusha Bhattacharya






With growing needs and interests, its the altruistic duty of the companies to fulfill customer means and make their own ends meet.


Today, mobile marketing is much more than the trending fundamentals. It is about the direct shift to how we interact and implement the benefits of internet and the degree of its acceleration. If you are a part of a mobile brand, you will know that there's not even a millisecond to sit back and watch how things play out because that would be like a life imprisonment to customer loyalty. With growing needs and interests, its the altruistic duty of the companies to fulfill customer means and make their own ends meet.

Since the mobile revolution began around 2000, significant changes and improvements have been made every single year, and 2018 will be no different.

Mobile video marketing grew significantly in 2015, and will only continue to become more pervasive this year, putting the industry on track to reach $13 billion by 2020. Take Audi and AT&T, for example. Large players in the ad space are experimenting with vertically-displayed video, since, by default, that’s how we hold our mobile devices. The real clincher is, since they’ve started doing this, they’ve noticed an 80% increase in the number of ads watched to completion.

When apps were first developed, there was a sense of novelty about them. They were cool, new things that let you use your phone in ways that you’d never imagined a phone could be used.

But now that apps are so pervasive, and every company has one, that novelty is wearing off. Fast. In fact, you could say it’s already gone.

From a marketing and revenue-driving standpoint, this is something that smart marketers are already taking advantage of.

But the data behind exactly how well these geo-targeting push campaigns work is so impossible to ignore, that it’s undeniable we’ll see more of it in 2018. When 84% of millennial's are already acting on something, you know you can’t ignore it.

Take this example: it’s the weekend, you’re visiting a friend’s city, walking downtown, and your favorite travel app sends you a notification about all the great lunch deals going on in the area. You check your phone and see the small restaurant across the street, though tiny, has a 4.5-star rating and is offering a buy-one-get-one 50% off on all lunch plates. The photos of the food look delicious, and you are getting hungry. So who gets your lunch dollars? That tiny restaurant you otherwise wouldn’t have noticed.

In 2015, 60% of Internet usage in the U.S. was via a mobile device, and it doesn’t look like that trend is slowing down anytime soon.


Content Credits:- Rusha Bhattacharya



Sexual harassment is a serious problem in the workplace and one that receives a lot of negative attention.


The word 'sexual harassment' can conjure up an idea of terror, insecurity and disgust in our minds. Sad but true, it is very much prevalent in corporate sectors. Estimates say, 72% women in India are a victim of sexual harassment in their workplaces. Among IT sectors, 4 out of 5 women suffer from subtle harassment on a daily basis. The genuine evil behind this is patriarchy.

According to Sanhita, a renowned activist of Calcutta, indecent gestures, repeated phonecalls, unlawful physical contact, denegrating a woman's image and so on are all a part of sexual harassment.

All you need to know about sexual harassment at the workplace Sreedivya VarmaJul 26, 2017    

Most discussions on sexual harassment at the workplace tend to veer around false complaints than genuine cases of harassment. But the reality is that there is more to worry about under-reporting than the misuse of the law.

There has been a lot of discussions lately on the topic of sexual harassment at the workplace. What exactly is sexual harassment? Often, the term is subjected to different interpretations. Some believe that it is better not to interact with female colleagues so that one does not get embroiled in a sexual harassment complaint. The reality of sexual harassment instances at the workplace is that there is more to worry about under-reporting, than people misusing the law.

Often, the term is subjected to different interpretations. Some believe that it is better not to interact with female colleagues so that one does not get embroiled in a sexual harassment complaint. The reality of sexual harassment instances at the workplace is that there is more to worry about under-reporting than people misusing the law.

The reality of sexual harassment instances at the workplace is that there is more to worry about under-reporting than people misusing the law.

Sexual harassment is a serious problem in the workplace and one that receives a lot of negative attention. In my experience, people talk more about false complaints than genuine cases of sexual harassment. India is a late entrant in formalising sexual harassment as a penal offence punishable with imprisonment and or penalty. In 1997, in the landmark

In 1997, in the landmark judgment on Vishakha vs State of Rajasthan, the Supreme Court of India defined sexual harassment at the workplace, pronounced preventive, prohibitory and redressal measures, and gave directives towards a legislative mandate to the guidelines proposed.The reality of sexual harassment instances at the workplace is that there is more to worry about under-reporting than people misusing the law.

Content Credits:- Rusha Bhattacharya